Upper Division/Second & Third Year Courses

Course Name and Description

  • 1 credit(s) Irregularly
  • The course will emphasize learning the skills of negotiation by simulations in which students will negotiate and watch their classmates negotiate. Class members will conduct three negotiations, a simple sales contract, a retainer agreement between an attorney and a client, and a complex multi-party dispute.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • An introduction to the world of fact investigation and analysis, this course will provide an overview of how to develop and scrutinize facts.  The course will cover five major topics: 1) How lawyers gather facts; 2) How lawyers evaluate evidence/facts; 3) How to organize evidence into a comprehensive narrative; 4) How human memory, biases, and perception affect fact gathering; and 5) The ethical issues surrounding fact investigations.  The course will involve a significant interactive skill development component including mock interviews, drafting exercises, guest speakers, and hands-on investigation exercises.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • The course will provide an applied property experience focused on learning strategic lawyering and practice oriented skills while developing knowledge about land use law and the administrative regulatory process.  The course will be structured around three important elements: 1) Learning by observing and interacting with local zoning board officials; 2) Translating knowledge into strategic action by focusing on how to use the law to advance your client’s interest; and 3) Solving real world and practice-based problems developed from actual zoning application files.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • A continuation of Constitutional Law I (LAW 602) for second-year law students. Must be taken during the second year. This course covers Individual Rights, that is, Due Process, Equal Protection and the First Amendment, including freedom of speech, the press and religion.
  • PREREQ: LAW 602

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Obtaining information about the government; restraints on publication; government surveillance; travel restrictions; war and emergency powers; nuclear weapons issues; civil disobedience and draft issues.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Principles of financial accounting applied to business entities: proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations; accounting for and tax implications of business organizations; and problems with estates and trusts. Not open to students who have more than one year of accounting.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Tax and other consequences of various plans of deferred compensation for executives and other employees.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Tax and other consequences of various plans of deferred compensation for executives and other employees.

  • 4 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Commercial practices under the Uniform Commercial Code, particularly sales, commercial paper and bank collections, letters of credit, bulk transfers, and secured transactions; business background, planning, and counseling.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Legal rules applicable to disputes with contacts to more than one state or country; the historical development of such rules; and their application in contract, tort, property, and other cases.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Constitutional and statutory requirement for investigative procedures in criminal cases. Topics include searches, seizures, lineups, confessions, and electronic surveillances.

  • 1 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course provides students with an overview of the substantive and procedural law involved in capital post-conviction litigation. Topics include an overview of some of the constitutional principles governing the imposition of the death penalty, the exclusion of intellectually disabled defendants from death-eligibility, effective assistance of counsel in capital cases, and certain aspects of state post-conviction and federal habeas corpus procedure. This course has a heavy experiential component in which students focus on developing lawyering skills needed for effective post-conviction capital litigation, including legal research and writing and effective courtroom advocacy.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Legal issues as they affect the lives of lesbians, gays, and bisexuals in the United States. Constitutional law, employment law, family law, property law, criminal law, and estate planning will be the areas of primary focus.

  • 4 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This is a business organizations course covering both unincorporated businesses and corporations. The first half of the course pertains to small business forms: partnerships; LLCs and close corporations. The balance covers public corporations, including regulation under securities laws.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Comprehensive coverage of issues of freedom of speech, the free exercise of religion, and establishment of religion.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course is designed for students who intend to engage in a heavy civil litigation practice. The course focuses on the skills, techniques, tactics, strategies and ethical considerations of witness preparation for depositions and the taking and defending of depositions under federal and state rules of civil procedure.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Law governing interstate succession; execution, and revocation of wills; inter vivos will substitutes; the creation, nature, and revocation of trusts.

  • 3-4 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Taxation of transfers during life and at death. Planning and alternative modes of disposition.

  • 4 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Procedural and substantive rules of evidence. Judicial notice, presumptions and burdens of proof, rules governing the receipt of oral and documentary evidence, impeachment, direct and cross-examination, competency, hearsay, privileges, and the best evidence rules.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • An important goal of the legal system is to guide, constrain, and react to human behavior. In doing so, the law makes numerous assumptions about people’s thoughts, beliefs, attitudes, and conduct-assumptions that may or may not be true. Psychology, as the empirical study of human thoughts, beliefs, attitudes and conduct, is in an important position to evaluate such assumptions. Over the past several decades, increasing numbers of social scientists have devoted substantial attention to the systematic study of law and legal institutions. At the same time, social scientists are testifying as experts in increasing numbers, and encouraging courts and policy-makers to use research evidence in adjudicating court cases and in setting public policy. This course will provide a survey of research in psychology as it relates to the legal and political process; in-class activities and demonstrations will form a significant part of the class. Among the topics covered may be jury decision-making, the insanity defense, paternalism, media violence, negotiation, race, trial consulting, obscenity and pornography, and capital punishment. Each topic will be considered from both a theoretical and an applied perspective.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • State regulation of family relations. Family autonomy, marital and nonmarital contracts, adoption. Issues in divorce: separation agreements, spousal and child support, property division, and child custody.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Essential functions of federal courts. Relationships between federal courts and the other branches of the federal government, the states, and the individual.

  • 3-4 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • A study of the structure and underlying principles of the U.S. Federal income tax system, including an introduction to tax planning.  This course devotes substantial class time to the fundamentals of statutory interpretation, including: agency adjudications, judicial review of agency action, statutory interpretation techniques, methodologies, and legislative history.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Income tax problems of the corporation and its shareholders, emphasizing corporate organization, distributions, redemptions, liquidations, reorganizations, collapsible corporations, and S corporations.
  • PREREQ: LAW 722

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Survey of the foundations of copyright, patent, unfair competition, and trade law. For students who wish to concentrate in intellectual property or who want a basic course as preparation for business planning or litigation practice.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course provides an introduction to the transactional, regulatory, and litigation aspects of international business involving at least one private party. Major areas of substantive coverage include international sales of goods (with special focus on the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods), licensing of technology, foreign direct investment, contract and tort liability in the United States and abroad, and the law proscribing corruption in cross-border transactions. We will also cover subsidiary litigation and regulatory topics, such as choice-of-law analysis, international commercial arbitration, international civil litigation in U.S. courts (focusing on jurisdiction and other procedural threshold issues), U.S. regulation of foreign investment and export controls, and intellectual property protection.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This course introduces students to the basic subjects, processes, and problems of contemporary public international law.  We begin by exploring the sources of public international law; the traditional role of states in international law formation; and the growing role of international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and subnational municipalities in transnational legal processes.  Our attention then turns to the relationship between international law and U.S. law, including the principles that govern (and impede) the application of international law in U.S. courts.  Rather than attempt to canvass the myriad subfields that comprise contemporary public international law, we devote sustained attention to a selection from among the following subjects: principles of jurisdiction, international regulatory regimes and globalization, state claims to natural resources, the law of war, and international human rights.  With this foundation in place, the course concludes with an invitation to grapple with several perennial critiques of the international legal system.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly

  • 2-3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Organization and representation of employees, union collective action; collective bargaining, including the administration and enforcement of collective agreements.

  • 1 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Students will be instructed on the procedures and laws governing jury selection in a criminal case, see jury selection modeled for them, and will also participate in simulated jury selection exercises under the supervision of experienced trial attorneys. An emphasis will be placed on identifying a theory of the case and identifying potential jurors who can be persuaded to accept the case theory. Other topics to be addressed include but are not limited to preparation, organization, interacting with the judge and opposing counsel, the role of the client, and overcoming objections.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course examines housing law through the lenses of federal and state law. Topics will include: The Fair Housing Act, housing affordability, smart cities, gentrification, exclusionary and inclusionary zoning, federal housing policy, community development and investment, and housing discrimination.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This is a survey class that covers First Amendment issues for all media, defamation, privacy, incitement and violence, FCC licensing, political programming, regulation of cable and satellite, copyright, international regulation, music, advertising, and film industry contracts.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Civil practice law and rules and interpretive cases and other aspects of civil litigation in New York.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Negotiation Skills will introduce students to the tools they need for effective negotiation. This course will focus on the three stages of negotiation: preparation, negotiation and post negotiation self ¿assessment. Students will negotiation numerous times during the semester and will receive feedback on their negotiations.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Standard residential and commercial real estate transactions, including consideration of brokerage arrangements, contracts of sale, methods of financing, methods of title protection, mortgage markets, construction loans, and permanent financing.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course will examine various areas of the law as they relate to sports (both professional sports and intercollegiate sports), including such areas as contract law, antitrust law, labor law, law regulating player agents, gender discrimination law, and personal injury law.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Securities Act of 1933: regulation of the distribution of securities, including the registration process, exempt securities, exempt transactions, enforcement, and liabilities. Securities Exchange Act of 1934: regulation of trading in securities and related market activities, including tender offers proxy solicitations, market manipulation, disclosure requirements, insider trading, and express and implied civil liabilities.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This is a survey of federal antitrust law and policy under the Sherman, Clayton, and FTC Acts. It takes an historic, layered approach, building on the four eras of antitrust enforcement: The Foundation Period (1890-1914); The Rule of Reason Period (1915-1939); The Per Se Rule and Focus on Market Structure (1940-1974); The Modern Era (1975-Present). The course covers basic economic theory of the free-market; The Rule of Reason and per se offenses; price fixing, market division, and boycotts; trade association behavior; monopoly and attempts to monopolize, mergers and joint ventures; vertical restraints like resale price maintenance; exclusive dealing and tie-in agreements; and selected exemptions from antitrust liability.

  • 3 credit(s) Every semester
  • Courtroom techniques and tactics drawing on substantive and procedural law and evidence courses. Students prepare and conduct trial exercises under direction of instructor.
  • Repeatable

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • A practical review of current intellectual property issues relating to trademarks, trade dress, false advertising, internet and the First Amendment, and rights of publicity. The course features mock courtroom presentations by experienced litigators and guest presentations by practitioners in the field.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course is designed primarily for students who plan to practice in the area of Patent Law before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) which permits only registered patent attorneys and agents to represent clients in the prosecution of patent applications. The course will cover the process of procuring a patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The course will also enhance students’ understanding of the legal standards for patentability (building upon the principles explored in Patents and Trade Secrets), will familiarize students with the PTO’s elaborate rules of practice in patent cases, and will provide students with practice applying these standards and rules to facts and situations encountered in basic patent prosecution practice.
  • PREREQ: LAW 765

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Development of skills used in the appellate process, including postjudgment practice, creation of the record, finding error, brief writing, and oral argument structure, emphasizing written skills. Required for second-year students seeking Moot Court Board membership.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This class deals with federal laws prohibiting discrimination against people with disabilities, with particular emphasis on the American Disabilities Act of 1990. The goal of the course is to provide you with a legal, conceptual, and practical understanding of people with disabilities, forms of discrimination that occur on the basis of disability, and the protections against such discrimination that currently exist.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This course examines the U.S. patent system and focuses on issues of patentability, validity, and infringement. The protection and enforcement of trade secrets are also covered.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Lawsuit emulates, as realistically as possible, a lawsuit from start to finish. Students will represent either the plaintiff or the defendant. The case begins when your client walks into your office. For the plaintiff, you must decide which claims to make. For the defense, it is your job to figure out how to defend your client against that claim, or what counter-claims you should bring. The class ends with a final trial. In between, you will represent your client at every stage of the litigation – from drafting the initial complaint and answer, filing discovery demands, answering interrogatories, conducting a deposition and participating in settlement discussions.
  • Student teams are supervised and classes are taught by the course’s co-instructors. Guest lecturers from the SUCOL faculty will also help teach students specific advocacy focused skill sets in preparation for the litigation’s various stages. In doing so, Lawsuit utilizes the collective expertise and experience of the SUCOL faculty to help best prepare students for the world of litigation.
  • The course is a year long and consists of three experiential credits for each semester.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Advanced copyright course. In-depth exploration of a number of copyright law areas in music, fine arts, and film; issues on the boundaries of copyright law. Includes fair use, work for hire in both industry and academia, compensation for ideas, moral rights, right of publicity, the impact of new technologies on research, data bases and fact-based works, infringement on unpublished works, and international copyright protection.

  • 2 credit(s) Every semester
  • Advanced training in direct and cross-examination, witness interviewing and preparation, negotiation techniques, voir dire and jury preparation, final arguments, discovery, pretrial and trial “”motions, pretrial conferences, jury trial techniques, posttrial procedure.
  • PREREQ: LAW 754

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course examines the rules and standards that govern the burgeoning subject of compliance and risk management. It will examine questions of governance: boards of directors, executives and third party vendors. It will examine the compliance function, organized by the nature of the enforcer: managers, regulators, prosecutors, whistleblowers, gatekeeper and plaintiffs; attorneys. It will also examine particular areas of law: information security, off-label drugs, foreign corrupt practices, money laundering, sexual harassment, etc.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course examines past and current developments in voting rights law. Topics include: the right to vote, the Voting Rights Act, laws that govern the political process, political representation, gerrymandering, election administration, political parties, ballot initiatives, and campaign finance.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • An introduction to the spectrum of processes other than courtroom litigation that are available for resolving disputes. This includes such “pure” processes as negotiation, mediation, and arbitration, and such “hybrid” processes as the Mini-Trial and the Summary Jury Trial.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • In this seminar we examine Asian American legal history and contemporary issues within historical context; and refine research, writing, presentation, and discussion skills. We cover topics and cases such as the Chinese Exclusion Acts, Yick Wo v. Hopkins, US v. Wong Kim Ark, Japanese American incarceration during World War II, the model assimilated minority myth and the bamboo ceiling, Asian Americans in the legal profession, and countering anti-Asian pandemic harassment. Students select cutting edge research topics. Substantial research papers and a class presentation are required. This course satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • A survey of legal issues relating to computers networks, including electronic commerce, the protection and enforcement of proprietary rights in software and electronic works, privacy and security, and content regulation. This course also explores the evidentiary use of computer records and other emerging issues in computer law.

  • 3-6 credit(s)
  • This three-credit course is the result of SUCOL’s effort to re-open the 1964 murder investigation of Frank Morris, a 51 year old African American business owner in Ferriday, Louisiana. Mr. Morris was pushed at gunpoint back into his burning store by suspected members of the Ku Klux Klan. He died four days later of burns over 100 % of his body. Although the FBI identified witnesses who pointed to two local law enforcement agents, no charges or indictments followed and the case was dropped. Seventy-five such cases have been identified by the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice with the assistance of the NAACP, the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Urban League. Students will each be assigned a different case to work up as a possible one to encourage the FBI to reopen. They will prepare chronologies, potential witness books, assess evidence and draft working memos of law on issues related to bringing this case to prosecution. Course projects will require consideration of a variety of legal issues, including state federal jurisdiction, federal laws on civil rights crimes, statutes of limitations speedy trial double jeopardy, mmunity, federal investigative and rosecutorial efforts, state and local prosecutions, and evidence. Course projects will require consideration of a variety of legal issues, including state/federal jurisdiction, federal laws on civil rights crimes, statutes of limitations/speedy trial/double jeopardy, immunity, federal investigative and prosecutorial efforts, state and local prosecutions, and evidence.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course will address ethical issues related to the competency assessment of elder clients. Income maintenance, including Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, and other public and private pensions as well as Medicare and Medicaid will be considered. Guardianship, long-term care, and estate planning will be considered as well. Additional topics may include employment discrimination, housing, health care decision making, and elder abuse.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • After introducing human rights law in the context of a case study on the death penalty, this course examines international human rights law from both a practical and theoretical perspective. The course is designed to provide students with an informed and critical perspective on international instruments, intergovernmental organizations, and domestic legal arrangements articulating and implementing human rights. Topics will include the historic origins of modern human rights law; the content of and connections between civil, political, social, and economic rights; relationships between human rights law, international criminal law, and the law of armed conflict; transnational strategies associated with implementation and enforcement of human rights law; the importance of soft law; and international responses to mass atrocities.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course provides a survey of the common law and statutory principles relating to modern employment.  Among the topics we will cover: the nature of the employment relationship, the at-will rule and its limitations, layoffs and unemployment insurance, employee mobility issues (e.g., covenants not-to-compete), employee privacy, family leave, worker safety, and wage and hour law.  This course is intended to provide an overview and survey of the field and there is some overlap with topics traditionally covered in Employment Discrimination and Labor Law courses.  While we will touch on some issues ordinarily covered in those course, we will not do so in the depth they are given when taught in distinct 3 or 4 credit courses.  During the semester, I hope to be able to provide those students who are interested with the opportunity to represent a claimant in an unemployment administrative hearing under my supervision.  Assisting a claimant in an unemployment insurance case provides students with the opportunity to learn about employment law in a very practical way.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • A study of negotiation and the lawyer’s role in the negotiating process. Ethical problems in negotiation. Negotiation skills taught through simulated negotiations.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course offers an introduction to the laws, practices, and policies governing the ability of non-United States citizens to enter and remain in the United States either temporarily or permanently.  The topics of study include the rights of non-U.S. citizens, the bases upon which the United States admits non-U.S. citizens either temporarily or permanently and the procedures for admission, the bases upon which non-U.S. citizens may be removed from the U.S. and the procedures for removal, the principles and policies behind the current and past system of immigration law, the complex and intricate statutory and regulatory framework governing immigration, and the roles and powers of the different branches of government in the development and implementation of immigration law and policy.  The material in this course will implicate and develop your understanding of other areas of law, including administrative law, international law, and constitutional law.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course will concern U.S. and international law responses to terrorism. The course will include a brief overview and history of terrorism. Topics will include legal definitions of terrorism, investigation and intelligence collection in the U.S. and abroad, apprehension of terrorists across borders, immigration and border controls, prosecution of terrorists, sanctions against terrorism and its supporters (including reprisal, assassination, asset freeze and forfeiture), crisis and consequence management in the event of terrorist attacks (including martial law and detention, domestic use of the military, catastrophic emergency measures, hostage and rescue operations), and law reform issues.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • As information technology advances, so do concerns about the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information. As a consequence of the digital revolution, the field of privacy law has grown exponentially in the past two decades.
  • This course focuses on the concept of information privacy generally and examines its tension with other competing values and interests, including free speech, national security, law enforcement, public health, and commercial interests. The course includes units on information privacy issues that arise in: media, law enforcement, national security, health records, government records, financial information; consumer data; and employment information. The course will also include a unit on international privacy law approaches (including, in particular, the E.U. Data Protection Directive).

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • An advanced exploration of regulatory decision making, focusing on the reasons for and methods used in implementing regulation; how policy and politics impact on regulatory decisions and relate to the legal authority of agencies; case studies of regulatory programs, their successes and failures. Course requirements include one or more research papers which will meet the College of Law writing requirement. Administrative Law or Public Administration and Law are prerequisites for this course. This one-semester course is a J.D./M.P.A. program requirement.
  • PREREQ: LAW 702

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • Constitutional and statutory requirements for adjudicative procedures in criminal cases. Topics include accus-atory instruments, bail, discovery, guilty pleas, double jeopardy, speedy trial, fair trial, jury trial, assistance of counsel, and confrontation.

  • 2-3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • The course will provide an understanding of the bar review and bar exam process as well as the skills necessary to be successful in the licensing process . A significant portion of the course will be spent discussing how to approach and do well on practice bar exam questions, including essays, performance tests and multiple choice questions. Time will be spent discussing how to learn from bar review outlines and lectures, and how to conduct a self-assessment to understand personal study habits and adjustments which must be made prior to the review of bar-tested subjects. The course will also cover specific topics and skills to help students understand how to manage their attitude, stress, and study time.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Legal Interviewing and Counseling is a course that will introduce students to the theory and practice of legal interviewing and counseling and the skills necessary to conduct interviews and provide counseling to clients. Classes will involve a combination of interaction discussion and interviewing and counseling sessions. In addition, students will be assigned one interviewing and one counseling demonstration to present in class that will include written submissions.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Constitutional civil rights litigation deals with constitutional theory and interpretation, emphasizing practical aspects and procedural tactics inherent in suing or defending a civil rights claim in federal court.  The course covers who are proper defendants under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, what kind of constitutional violation must be shown, how causation works for constitutional torts, immunity and other defenses that have been read into the statute, how damages are assessed, and when successful plaintiffs can recover attorneys fees.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This is a one-semester applied learning course. The goal of this course is to expose students to disability law and policy as applied to real situations. Each student will work on a project that has originated from a request from a “real client” or client organizations, such as the National Council on Disability, the World Bank, Mental Disability Rights International, or other organizations that work with and for people with disabilities.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This applied learning course is designed to expose students to a number of areas of practice that are common for house counsel. Students will work individually and in teams and undertake simulations in litigation management, agreement negotiation and drafting, employment problems, and intellectual property practice. Students will learn how lawyers handle complex problems in such diverse areas and may conduct research, draft agreements and file memoranda, conduct interviews, and negotiate to resolve the issues found in the practical exercises that will be the backbone of the course.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This applied learning course allows students interested in the areas of intellectual property and business law to apply their knowledge to actual new technology.  Students work in supervised teams consulting with companies, entrepreneurs, or universities that are seeking to commercialize new technologies. The finished product includes a report and presentation that covers such things as: analyzing the technology, investigating intellectual property protection, examining the market landscape, identifying any regulatory concerns, and exploring opportunities for funding or licensing.  Instructor guides the issue-spotting and provides feedback on reports through the individual team supervisors: Professor of Practice Jack Rudnick and adjunct professors Dean Bell and Dominick Danna, and project advisor Chris Horacek.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This applied learning course will build on the fundamentals of the Real Estate Transactions I course and will focus on the development of a regional shopping mall which will provide a framework for the course outline. The course will not only provide ways to convey many of the concepts found in this type of real estate, but will also provide the basis to explore the relationship between the real estate concepts and the business framework of which they become a part. Case law will be utilized to supplement certain interpretations of Real Property Law.
  • PREREQ: LAW 747

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This Course will focus on alternative dispute resolution in the family law area. Students will study mediation and collaborative law through written materials and mock exercises. The ethical issues involved in these forms of ADR will also be addressed.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • The National Security and Counterterrorism Research Center serves as a working research laboratory for law and other graduate students interested in national security and counterterrorism issues. Students will work in teams on research projects assigned by the director. Typically, the projects will involve assessments of legal and law-related issues of concern to federal, state, and local government officials in responding to national security and terrorism threats. Other projects may examine private sector security concerns.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This course is the first part of a two part year-long sequence on legal issues arising from start-up companies as they develop and move towards an initial public offering.  This first part covers the legal issues arising from protection on inventions and creations through intellectual property law, choice of business entity, basic securities law, contracts, employment law, licensing, and antitrust.  The course is designed for students across disciplines (law, business, engineering, information science, public policy) who are interested in the legal foundations for start-ups and entrepreneurship.  For JD students, pursuing LAW 815 and the Technology Commercialization track, the two-semester sequence of LAW 824 and LAW 825 replaces and expands upon the previous LAW  814 and is strongly recommended for LAW 815 and technology commercialization career.  JD students must take both LAW 824 and LAW 825; non-JD students can take either or both semesters.  Writing credit is available for law students.

  • 3 credit(s)
  • This course is the second part of a two part year-long sequence on legal issues arising from start-up companies as they develop and move towards an initial public offering. This second part covers the legal issues arising from protection of design through intellectual property law, licensing drafting, exhaustion of intellectual property rights, FDA regulation introduction, Telecom and Internet regulation introduction, and the relationship between antitrust and regulation. This course is designed for students across disciplines (law, business, engineering, information science, public policy) who are interested in the legal foundations for start-ups and entrepreneurship. For JD students pursuing LAW 815 and the Technology Commercialization track, the two-semester sequence of LAW 824 and LAW 825 replaces and expands upon the previous LAW 814 and is strongly recommended for LAW 815 and a technology commercialization career. JD students must take both LAW 824 and 825; non-JD students can take either or both semesters. Writing credit available for law students.

  • 1.5-2 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • This course combines diverse aspects of business and law education in a transaction-based setting. It guides students through a syndicated commercial loan, including the structuring, negotiation, pricing, and documentation.
  • COREQ: LAW 712

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • The course will cover Federal and New York rules of evidence, and constitutional rules pertaining to the rights to confront and present a defense, in connection with a range of issues typically arising in criminal cases. Weekly assignments will be designed to simulate work that would be performed in a prosecutor’s or defender’s office. They will include motions in liminie and supporting memoranda, inter-office trial preparation memoranda, and both trial court and appellate advocacy of evidentiary issues. The course is a limited enrollment course and the grade will be based exclusively on written and oral advocacy.
  • PREREQ: LAW 718

  • 3 credit(s)
  • Across the country, fiscal pressures, political changes, and a growing embrace of evidence-based approaches to policymaking have created a momentum around criminal justice reform. These reform efforts seem especially promising because of their interdisciplinary roots and their bipartisan support. While some data points – like drops in prison populations and declining arrest rates – demonstrate the these initial efforts are having an incremental impact, more transformative reforms are needed. The seminar will address criminal justice reform broadly, covering a range of criminal justice reform topics including, for example, prosecutorial discretion, right to counsel, sentencing and punishment, reentry, mental health issues, risk assessment, juvenile rights, plea bargaining, privatization, and comparative international criminal justice reform. The course will include special focus on three particular areas of criminal justice reform that are currently capturing significant attention in the criminal justice community: (i) policing, (ii) pretrial detention and bail reform, and (iii) the opioid crisis. Students taking this course will learn about these topics through in-class guess speakers, assigned readings, and their own outside research. Students will assemble a final report focusing on criminal justice reform topics. The final projects are expected to include practical blue prints for federal, state, or local policymakers. In developing their own writing projects for the course, students will have the option of working alone (to satisfy the College of Law Writing Requirement) or collaborating with others to develop reports on the aforementioned topics.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • The 2009 White House Cyberspace Policy Review states: The United States needs to conduct a national dialogue on cybersecurity to ensure an integrated approach toward the Nation’s need for security and the national commitment to privacy rights and civil liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and law. This three-credit, one-semester seminar intends to be part of that dialog. Some cyber security law already exists. Other laws of long standing present issues of applicability or adaptability to the cyber realm. Many proposals remain in Congressional committees, such as bills that would mandate security measures for all entities receiving federal money, establish a federal certification for technicians serving computer networks of entities receiving federal money, and provide the President with authority to “pull the plug” on national Internet connectivity in times of emergency. This course is premised on the belief that much policy and law to implement it will be made in the next few years to institute a national policy to protect U.S. interests in cyberspace. The seminar uses an interdisciplinary approach, but no special background or prerequisites are required.

  • 3 credit(s)
  • This course examines the historical and contemporary treatment of women under the Constitution, statutes, and common law.  Students will examine how the legal system has constructed and applied notions of gender and gender equality.  It will introduce students to significant contemporary legal scholarship on the status of women in modern America, and will explore how gender affects legal relationships and status.  Feminist jurisprudence, or feminist theory, will be applied to doctrinal legal issues.  Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Class action is the most controversial procedural device. After studying the technical issues (prerequisites, certification, notice, opt out, settlement, res judicata) and its specific applications (consumer, antitrust, security, discrimination, mass tort) in concrete cases (tobacco, asbestos, Wal-Mart), you will be able to better understand the political and social implications behind class actions. Although class actions may bring social change and right injustices, it may also be improperly used to harass and blackmail defendants into settling non-meritorious claims. The course also deals with non-class aggregation, like joinder, impleader, interpleader, intervention, consolidation, transfers, and bankruptcy. It is also an excellent opportunity to review civil procedure concepts.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course will introduce students to the European Union, its legal system and legal doctrines. Topics covered include the European Union and its principal institutions, the constitutional framework of the European Union, the operation of the Court of Justice of the European Union, legislative procedure, the internal market, and fundamental rights.

  • 1-2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • One of the most important duties of lawyers is to help people identify and secure their essential rights and responsibilities. Serving clients effectively requires that lawyers ask the right questions. When addressing economic rights, here are nine important questions: (1) Why does wealth tend to concentrate in market economies even in times of great prosperity? (2) Why does the great promise of the industrial revolution (abundance and leisure) remain unfulfilled for most people? (3) Why does every generation of students graduate deeper in debt? (4) What is behind the adage, it takes money to make money? (5) How can more economic opportunity become more broadly distributed? (6) What are the growth and distributive consequences of the fact that most capital is acquired with the earnings of capital? (7) Is there a practical, efficient way to enable all people to acquire capital with the earnings of capital, without taking anything from existing owners? (8) What is the relationship between the distribution of capital ownership and the functioning of a democracy? (9) What role can lawyers play in pursuing these and related questions to better serve their clients, themselves, and society? This seminar will explore these and related questions. The seminar will not require an above average mathematical aptitude or prior exposure to economics, but rather only an open mind and a willingness to approach economic issues from a foundation grounded in professional responsibility. Students will read assigned material, do additional reading of their own choosing, make an in-class presentation (optional), and write a paper that will satisfy the writing requirement for graduation.

  • 1 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Domestic legal systems vouchsafe and define “privacy,” and its first cousin “dignity,” in different ways that strongly reflect local legal and cultural values.  Yet, in an increasingly globalized world, purely local protection of privacy interests may prove insufficient to safeguard effectively fundamental autonomy interests – interests that lie at the core of self-definition, personal autonomy, and freedom.  This short course will survey constitutional privacy rights in the United States, Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights.  Consideration of constitutional privacy protections in these jurisdictions will establish important points of transnational agreement about how to define and protect privacy interests; it will also demonstrate that serious disagreements exist about protecting privacy – most notable in resolving the inherent tension between protecting both privacy and freedom of speech.  The course will give sustained attention to the potential benefits and challenges that will confront any serious efforts to harmonize constitutional privacy protections across national borders.  A comparative legal analysis of privacy will also illuminate, some of the important underlying social and political values that lead the U.S. to fail to protect privacy as reliably or as comprehensively as other liberal democracies.  Finally, and no less important in this era of Big Data, drones, and society-wide surveillance programs, the short course will consider carefully the significant interrelationship that exists between privacy and speech in the context of sustaining and facilitating democratic self-government.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course will explore estate planning from two perspectives. First, it will deal with the substantive aspects of estate and gift tax and property law (including joint interests, life insurance, and retirement plan proceeds) which must be considered in developing an estate plan. Wills, trusts, and other planning techniques will be considered in detail. Second, the practical aspects of dealing with estate planning clients will be considered in depth, including how to explain difficult technical matters to the client, how to present documents to clients in an understandable format, and issues of ethics and professionalism. Short drafting and writing exercises as well as a substantial paper, consisting of a package of client memoranda and documents, will be required.
  • COREQ: LAW 715 AND LAW 717
  • Repeatable

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Federal and state laws and regulations affecting banks in the United States.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This highly interdisciplinary, team-taught course covers the fundamental engineering, economic, and legal principles underlying the smart grid. It focuses on building the skills needed to design and test the protocols, policies, and specifications for enabling technologies that will guarantee the security and integrity of the grid while preserving personal privacy and providing maximum market flexibility with minimal need for new regulation. Students who complete the course will be able to integrate four perspectives – technology, security, economics, and law – allowing them to lead the development of the next generation electric grid.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Race and Law is a 3-credit graduate law discussion class critically examining the ways laws and courts address issues of race and construct race relations in the United States. Primary readings are historical and modern legal cases, the U.S. constitution, relevant U.S. statutes, and interdisciplinary scholarship on race and law. This course studies the history of treatment of African-Americans, Native peoples, Latinos, Asians and White people in American law before we look at particular topic areas and contemporary legal analyses. Topics may include equality doctrine, education and segregation, civil rights (e.g., housing, employment, public accommodations, and legal responses to civil rights organizing), criminal laws, policing and profiling, and prisons, sexuality and family, immigration, and existing and potential legal remedies. Weekly reading assignments, periodic online exercises, and active, engaged class discussions of assigned materials are critical components of the course. Students are required to write a 10-12 page analytical paper on one of the topics covered in the course and based on course materials and readings. Students may also be required to facilitate a class discussion on reading assignments and create a research bibliography. This law school course is open to non-law graduate students on a limited basis. Non-law students are required to get permission of the professor before enrolling in this law school class.

  • 3 credit(s) At least 1x fall or spring
  • The advent of the digital age has changed the way lawyers exchange information in litigation.  Whether it be on computers, cell phones, tablets, data management portals, or social media, the key documents and information necessary to litigate are stored electronically, posing never before seen challenges for today’s lawyer.  Whether advising a client of litigation holds and data retention policies, propounding or responding to discovery demands, preparing for and taking depositions, or engaging in motion practice on evidentiary issues, understanding technology is paramount to the modern day litigator.  In this course, you will be that lawyer.  Employed as an associate at a fictional law firm, you will be responsible for managing all aspects of electronic discovery in two cases, from the initial client interviews, through and including depositions and trial preparation.  Taught by a lawyer with experience as an associate and partner at large law firms in New York City and Boston, boutique practices, a federal clerkship, and as in-house counsel, this course offers a great opportunity to learn both the law and the requisite skills to be a successful lawyer in the digital age.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Using a series of case study modules that jump off the front page, the course examines critically the hardest U.S. national security law and policy challenges of the decades ahead. The case studies range from decisions to intervene and what laws apply if we do intervene in humanitarian crises, insurrections, or civil wars, and what laws should govern when we are involved; dealing with the Arab Spring; dealing with Iran and North Korea related to nuclear weapons; anticipating and controlling new technologies in warfare and surveillance; managing civil/military relations in protecting the homeland; countering the cyber threats to our infrastructure and cyber attacks waged by nation states, such as China and Russia; managing public health as a national security issue; resource depletion and global warming as a national security issue. Students will learn to integrate legal and policy analyses, and will gain lessons in how policy is made and implemented with significant legal guidance. Students will present analyses of case studies to the class, and will write briefing memoranda concerning some of the case study modules.
  • COREQ: LAW 700

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Trial work is a relatively modest fraction of a litigator’s life. Yet most law schools routinely offer trial advocacy courses, and largely ignore the other practical forms and occasions for litigation advocacy. This is a one-semester program where aspiring litigators would confront the more typical litigation problems that would combine and hone their training in legal writing and written advocacy, civil and criminal procedure, and privilege and other issues arising in the course of discovery, motion practice, negotiation and oral advocacy. This experiential course would accomplish this through a series of classroom simulations and written homework assignments that required the students to address a series of typical litigation problems.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • This course introduces students to recent developments in international human rights and comparative disability law, including an analysis of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (CRPD). The CRPD was entered into force in 2008 as the first treaty to protect the rights of people with disabilities under international law. This course is for law students and other graduate students who are interested in disability rights and international human rights law, generally. The course uses disability as a case study for the study of the development of international human rights protections for certain groups; the adoption, monitoring, and implementation of UN treaties; the role of regional human rights tribunals in enforcing human rights protections for people with disabilities; and the relationship between international human rights laws and domestic disability-related laws in selected countries.

  • 3 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Climate change (global warming) is rapidly becoming one of the most pressing issues of the twenty-first century. This course introduces students to the challenges posed by climate change through a unique multidisciplinary exploration of the scientific, economic, policy, communicative, and even philosophical dimensions of the issue. The course will cover topics such as the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, the role of the media in shaping public opinion on the issue, competing discourses of climate change, risk and uncertainty in decision-making, costs and benefits of different types of policies, the Kyoto protocol and other policy initiatives, actions being taken to address the issue, and the ethical dimensions of the choices facing humanity. Faculty from SU and ESF in law, economics/public administration, earth science, and environmental studies will co-teach this course and bring to students a unique dialog that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Moreover, emphasis will be placed on drawing out the general lessons obtained from a multidisciplinary approach to climate change: many of the insights will be applicable to other complex, highly technical environmental problems. This course is intended to bring together students from a diverse range of backgrounds and does not have specific prerequisites.

  • 1-2 credit(s)
  • Client problems brought to a good D.C. attorney are almost always solved through a combination of legislative pressure, executive branch pressure, and perhaps ultimately litigation against either another party and/or an agency of the executive branch. Very often the best solutions to these problems are forged behind the scenes, the opposite of the way lawyers in other jurisdictions often serve their clients interests. This seminar will feature influential and successful D.C. attorneys and distinguished guest lecturers to discuss one or more client problems brought to them and how they went about a solution. Each week, students will go through a real case study problem set that the guest lecturer encountered in his or her practice, whether in government, a nonprofit, a corporation, or a law firm. After establishing a fact pattern, students will discuss the various options for solving the legal problem. Finally, students will hear from the guest lecturer how he or she actually attacked the legal problem, and the outcome if known. Students will also discuss projects that they have been working on along with any issues that may have arisen.

  • 6 credit(s) Every semester
  • Student attorneys represent clients charged with misdemeanors and violations in Syracuse City Court. They engage in extensive fact investigation, interviewing, client counseling, and plea negotiations, and appear regularly in local courts. They also assist clients with civil matters related to the pending criminal charges
  • COREQ: LAW 746

  • 2 credit(s)
  • The pro bono bankruptcy clinic consists of a clinic open to second and third year students, and a pro bono volunteer program open to first year students. The upper division clinic students will represent an indigent client in filing a bankruptcy case and will be in charge of the team supervising the first year student volunteers. The clinic students will be responsible for obtaining from the clients all of the information required by the Bankruptcy Code for filing a bankruptcy case, organizing that information, drafting the petition and schedules, and representing the client at the official meeting of creditors. Students will also address an legal issues that arise in the case. The class component will involve formal training in basic consumer bankruptcy law and practice, and an open discussion of issues that arise in the cases.

  • 6 credit(s) Only during the summer
  • Students will spend the first week of the seven week program attending lectures by authorities in English law.  This introduction to the English Legal System will prepare the students for their internships by providing an overview of the fundamental tenets of English law, with an emphasis on English legal institutions, court structure, the legal profession, and adjudicative procedure in both civil and criminal cases. Classes during this first week will meet for a minimum of 15 hours and will be supplemented by visits to one of the Inns of Court and the Houses of Parliament and by a guided tour of Legal London.  Following this first week of classes, students will undertake six-week internships with barristers, solicitors, public agencies or other legal organizations, under the supervision of Syracuse University College of Law faculty.  Internships are full-time jobs, and students are expected to work the normal hours at their placements..  During this six-week period these internship experiences are augmented by once-a-week, two-hour evening seminars conducted by the program faculty and cooperating English practitioners.
  • Repeatable

  • 3 credit(s) Every semester
  • The Low Income Taxpayer Clinic offers legal assistance to low income taxpayers who have controversies with the I.R.S. The controversies may include collection, examination, appeals or Tax Court matters. Student attorneys will also be involved in community outreach and education regarding income tax matters.
  • COREQ: LAW 722 AND (LAW 746 OR LAW 647) 

  • 2 credit(s) Every semester
  • The NY Externship Program provides students with the opportunity to work with lawyers. The program consists of a two-credit seminar that meets once a week which discusses lawyering as a profession and a 2 or 3 credit yearlong externship placement during which students work under the supervision of a lawyer in offices throughout Upstate New York.
  • COREQ: LAW 746 OR LAW 647

  • 2-12 credit(s) Every semester
  • This is a 2-12 credit externship placement where students work under the supervision of a lawyer in offices throughout Central New York.

  • 6 credit(s) Every semester
  • The Disability Rights Clinic is dedicated to providing representation to individuals and groups in our community who are unable to secure representation elsewhere. One reason DRC clients are unable to find other lawyers to represent them is due to their lack of financial resources. In our community, as elsewhere, the vast majority of lawyers provide legal assistance only to those who can afford to pay for their services. And in recent years, federal funding, the major source of funding for legal services for people with low or no incomes, has been reduced dramatically. A second reason DRC clients are unable to find lawyers elsewhere relates to the types of cases they may have which may involve controversial issues or conflicts of interest for other lawyers. DRC student attorneys practice in federal and state courts, and before administrative agencies in a broad range of civil rights matters, including race, gender, age and disability discrimination, sexual harassment, prisoners rights, immigration, accessibility under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and employment matters.
  • COREQ: LAW 746 OR LAW 647 AND LAW 763

  • 6 credit(s)
  • COREQ: LAW 746 OR LAW 647

  • 10 credit(s)
  • Students in the final year of law school to devote their last semester of study to performing pro bono service for the poor through an approved externship, legal services provider, law firm, or corporation.  Placements are available in Central New York and Washington, DC.  Only students selected by the Pro Bono Scholars Program committee and approved by the New York Court of Appeals may register for the course.  Students accepted for the Program will spend 12 weeks working full time in a placement beginning in March.  Students will also have a seminar component, Pro Bono Scholars Seminar, for which they will earn two credits.

  • 2 credit(s) Irregularly
  • Advanced Legal Research expands upon the foundation of research skills acquired in the first year. The course addresses effective research methods and strategies, examines the structural and theoretical underpinnings of traditional and automated research systems, and explores specialized areas of research (such as legislative history, administrative law, and non-legal resources). Students will have ample opportunities to refine research techniques through hands-on practice sessions in the law library.